We'll miss Trevor's diary

PUBLISHED: 02:01 17 April 2008 | UPDATED: 08:58 10 June 2010

I, like many more of your readers, was upset that Trevor Bartlett has decided to call it a day with his Country Diary. An avid reader of this column each week, I will greatly miss not only the topic (through which, over the years, I have learnt a great d

I, like many more of your readers, was upset that Trevor Bartlett has decided to call it a day with his Country Diary. An avid reader of this column each week, I will greatly miss not only the topic (through which, over the years, I have learnt a great deal) but also his witty humour in the way he writes - it has always been an enjoyable and pleasurable read each week. One I am going to miss.I can understand why, after 25 years, Trevor has hung up his hat (so to speak). He has not only written each week without fail for your paper, but has also carried out unfailingly, in all weathers and conditions, wildlife work and rescue. I'm sure not many of your readers know that, whatever time of the day or night, if Trevor has received a call about an injured animal or bird, he has always gone out to try to rescue the creature involved - and quite often he has taken it home and nursed the injured bird or animal back to health before releasing back into the wild. He has sat up all night to feed and care for any sick animal that has needed it and is always very upset when he loses a "patient".As for his wife Sandra - not knowing what he is going to bring home next - she must have the patience and understanding of a saint! I know that once she got home from work to find a seal in her bath! When there have been oil disasters, she has also helped in the care of the birds and animals affected - not a nine to five job. I think it takes a special kind of wife to be able to put up with the "not knowing what will happen next" lifestyle. Trevor is also a lucky man to have found a lady like Sandra.His knowledge and care for animals and the countryside stem back to his childhood and his mum, Marjorie, to whom he paid tribute in his last diary. Through her always allowing him to bring anything home and look after it (not many mums would allow this today), finding out its likes and dislikes and how it lives, set him on the road to a lifetime of caring and learning all he could about the wildlife and countryside around us. He has given many talks over the years on various animals (his favourite, I think, being badgers) some of which I was lucky enough to attend. He made it all so very interesting to hear that I couldn't wait to go to another. He has also spent a lot of time filming animals to help people understand the ways and lives of animals so that we mere humans can understand them better.If you have ever e-mailed, written or telephoned Trevor, he is always there to offer advice or help if he is able and, if you have ever taken an injured animal to his house, he would never turn it away.It takes a special kind of a person to carry out this type of unpaid, often thankless work and I don't think there is anyone who has dedicated a greater number of years of their life to helping the wildlife and countryside around us. Even if he has given up the writing, I feel sure Trevor will never give up or turn his back on any animal needing his help. Well done, Trevor, and thank you for 25 years of enjoyable, knowledgeable reading.Name and address supplied. ***May I place on record my thanks to Trevor Bartlett for informing and entertaining us for so long with his weekly nature articles, now sadly discontinued. It was the first thing I looked for when opening the paper.Bernard Reeves,Flat 7, 23 Cheshire Road,Exmouth.EDITOR'S NOTE: We were also very sad when Trevor decided to put away his pen. He has been a great supporter of our newspapers over the years and we cannot thank him enough.

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