Turning back time at Exmouth venue

PUBLISHED: 09:00 27 March 2015 | UPDATED: 12:03 27 March 2015

A la Ronde Assistant House Steward James Weckmueller winds a Grandfather clock dating back to around 1820 which was made by David Whitelaw of Edinburgh. Every Sunday at noon during March visitors to the National Trust property can watch all the clocks in the house being wound and set. Ref exe 0537-12-15SH. Picture: Simon Horn

A la Ronde Assistant House Steward James Weckmueller winds a Grandfather clock dating back to around 1820 which was made by David Whitelaw of Edinburgh. Every Sunday at noon during March visitors to the National Trust property can watch all the clocks in the house being wound and set. Ref exe 0537-12-15SH. Picture: Simon Horn

Archant

Visitors to A la Ronde this month have been watching the clocks at the National Trust house being wound and set.

Assistant house steward James Weckmueller, pictured, has been winding the clocks every Sunday at noon.

There are eight clocks in the house and it takes James around 40 minutes to carry out his weekly routine.

The oldest clock in the house, which can be found in its study, dates back to 1760.

James said: “It gives me great joy to keep the A la Ronde clock up and running, engaging with our supporters in the process and to play my part in bringing this unusual, quirky property to life.”


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