Trees felled by storms to be harvested for fuel

PUBLISHED: 09:00 12 April 2014

John Wilding looks at the storm damage at the Boundridge plantation on the East Devon Pebblebed Heaths. Picture by Guy Newman.

John Wilding looks at the storm damage at the Boundridge plantation on the East Devon Pebblebed Heaths. Picture by Guy Newman.

© Guy Newman - 07831 379971

Trees that fell down in February’s storms are to be cleared and turned into sustainable fuel by an East Devon landowner.

Clinton Devon Estates (CDE) says it has called in specialist teams to clear the fallen trees, which are mostly in recently thinned areas close to the sea, writes Sean Keywood.

Every year the estate harvests around 20,000 tonnes of Forest Stewardship Council-certified timber from its managed forests.

The amount felled in the storms in East Devon is about a quarter of this, so CDE’s harvesting teams are concentrating on recovering this wood and taking it to market.

CDE’s John Wilding said: “This year many trees across the UK were affected by the storms which hit the country, particularly in February.

“The high winds we encountered came on top of one of the wettest winters on record, which resulted in trees’ root systems not being as well supported as they would otherwise be.

“Climate change predictions are for more severe and less predictable weather patterns, and the number of trees coming down – as highlighted recently by the National Trust – is one of the consequences of this. It’s something that everyone will have to get used to, and we’re committed to preparing for the challenges which lie ahead.”


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