Seagulls pose a health risk

Bill Smith, of Lympstone, writes of people who want seagulls culled as living on a different planet. Well, he must certainly be on a different planet to the rest of the population living in coastal areas.

Bill Smith, of Lympstone, writes of people who want seagulls culled as living on a different planet.

Well, he must certainly be on a different planet to the rest of the population living in coastal areas.

I was very relieved to hear that the local authority are arranging for the seagull population here in Exmouth to be reduced. As experienced in other major towns, the seagulls have been increasing in numbers and getting more aggressive each year. In both the town centre and residential areas, they nest and then attack people for food or to defend their 'area', even when people are going about their ordinary business. They frighten and sometimes injure people, including children. They may sometimes look 'attractive', as mentioned, but with their aggressiveness and the filthy mess they make, they are a definite health risk to the public. It is, therefore, imperative that action be taken to reduce their numbers in the cause of real public health and safety.

That is what local authorities are for, to authorise action. That is why licences are issued by authorities in the interests of public health and safety. The alternative is to be cowed and totally dominated by gulls.


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Samuel Smith,

Exmouth.(via email).

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