Seagulls are not 'vermin'

PUBLISHED: 11:13 30 August 2008 | UPDATED: 09:34 10 June 2010

I was disgusted on reading the callous anti-seagull article (Why protect vermin seagulls? - Exmouth Journal, August 14) and the article in your newspaper of July 31. I am certain that the majority of local residents, who have lived here all, or for a grea

I was disgusted on reading the callous anti-seagull article (Why protect vermin seagulls? - Exmouth Journal, August 14) and the article in your newspaper of July 31.I am certain that the majority of local residents, who have lived here all, or for a great part of their lives, and people who have chosen to come here to live, because of their love of the estuary and seaside, do not consider that seagulls are "vermin", but are a natural part of the scene in all coastal areas. They are a protected species, and rightly so.I find it difficult to understand how a seagull, with its expert flying skills, could get itself trapped in a TV aerial or a boat's rigging, as reported, unless it has been firstly harassed, startled and confused into doing so. Seagulls are unlikely to land on TV aerials or a boat's rigging.I am sure that animal lovers would be extremely grateful to the fire service if they were to rescue their pet in such a situation. Likewise, I would think that any decent person would be upset if a seagull, or any wild animal, in similar circumstances, were just left to suffer and slowly starve to death.With regard to seagulls' "noise", I have never found this to be a problem, despite always living close to the estuary. I would have thought the noise of early morning traffic, on the busy Hulham Road, would be more of a problem than the cries of a few seagulls.Bill Smith,35 Gibraltar Road, Lympstone.

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