Police welcome response to knives amnesty

Knives surrendered in a previous year's amnesty

Some of the knives handed in during a previous year's amnesty - Credit: Devon and Cornwall Police

More than 145 knives were surrendered at police stations in Devon and Cornwall Police during a week-long amnesty. 

They ranged from small pocket knives to decorative weapons, along with a range of kitchen knives - all of which will now be destroyed. 

Many more knives may have been removed from circulation during the amnesty, from Saturday, November 15 to Sunday, November 21, since people who could not get to a police station with a knife disposal bin were asked to take knives to a recycling centre. 

As part of the week of action the force also responded to intelligence around knife crime, conducted stop searches and liaised with selected retailers, community groups and schools in key areas across the force area. 

Police also reminded communities about the changes in legislation which came into effect in July this year, making it an offence to possess items such as knuckledusters, throwing stars and zombie knives, even in a private place. 

Detective Chief Inspector Scott Bradley said: “I’m really pleased with the response we’ve had from this amnesty and the public support during the week.   

“Any knife handed in means there is one less on our streets.  Clearly people have taken this opportunity to hand in these potentially dangerous items which will now be safely destroyed.  

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“Devon and Cornwall are two of the safest places to live and work, and whilst knife crime is relatively low compared to other areas of the country, we are not complacent.  Throughout the year we run regular amnesties and undertake prevention work with the intention of keeping knife crime low. 

“We would suggest that if anyone still has knives they wish to dispose of and have missed the amnesty they should take these to their local recycling centre.” 


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