New moves for Royal Marines

PUBLISHED: 01:01 31 January 2008 | UPDATED: 08:48 10 June 2010

LYMPSTONE Royal Marines are being taught Spiderman moves to help them survive in combat. Daredevil street moves known as 'free running' or 'Parkour' involve the Commandos leaping between rooftops, vaulting off lampposts and bollards and scaling walls a

LYMPSTONE Royal Marines are being taught Spiderman moves to help them survive in combat. Daredevil street moves known as 'free running' or 'Parkour' involve the Commandos leaping between rooftops, vaulting off lampposts and bollards and scaling walls - all without equipment.The gravity-defying moves, normally associated with block-buster films such as James Bond in Casino Royale, has become a youth street craze, topping skateboarding in its popularity.Marines based at Lympstone have been taught the moves by professional free-runners to improve their levels of fitness and as a way of exploring different methods of training.The Commandos teamed up with the Extreme Sports Channel and Urban Freeflow - a group of professional free-runners called EZ, Livewire and Sticky - who put the Marines through their paces.Initial training focussed on learning the basics of the extreme sport before they were able to progress on to the streets of London to practise moves with names like 'Kong Vault', 'Running Cat' and 'Crane'.Captain Sean Lerwill RM said: "To be introduced to Parkour by a group of professionals was an experience not to be forgotten. Both groups have the same drive and desire to succeed and be the best in their field." Founded by David Belle in France, Parkour gives a high level of mental and physical training.Sometimes abbreviated to PK or l'art du deplacement (the art of displacement), it is an activity with the aim of moving from one point to another as efficiently and quickly as possible, using principally the abilities of the human body.It is meant to help overcome obstacles, which can be anything in the surrounding environment - from branches and rocks to rails and concrete walls - and can be practised in both rural and urban areasFounder David Belle said: "The physical aspect of Parkour is getting over all the obstacles in your path as you would in an emergency. You want to move in such a way, with any movement, as to help you gain the most ground on someone or something, whether escaping from it or chasing toward it.

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