Lympstone Manor’s celebrity chef Michael Caines has spoken of his own adoption for a charity documentary

PUBLISHED: 16:34 18 October 2018 | UPDATED: 16:34 18 October 2018

Celebrity chef Michael Caines, Lympstone Manor patron, has backed an adoption charity by sharing his own experience on video.
Michael, who went to school in Exeter, recently told former BBC presenter Kally Adderkin- Hall why he was supporting adoption charity Families for Children.

Celebrity chef Michael Caines, Lympstone Manor patron, has backed an adoption charity by sharing his own experience on video. Michael, who went to school in Exeter, recently told former BBC presenter Kally Adderkin- Hall why he was supporting adoption charity Families for Children.

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Celebrity chef Michael Caines, Lympstone Manor patron, has backed an adoption charity by sharing his own experience on video.

Michael, who went to school in Exeter, recently told former BBC presenter Kally Adderkin- Hall why he supports south west adoption charity Families for Children.

The chef, who is Families for Children patron, said funding was crucial to help children find loving families and to provide ongoing support after adoption.

He said: “Adoption does work and gives a huge amount of benefit for the adoptee and parent alike.

“Families for Children is a brilliant charity. I do believe in adoption and Families for Children need support for funding - not just for adoptions but also for after care.”

In a Families for Children Trust documentary, Michael, who was awarded an MBE in 2006 for services to the hospitality industry, spoke about growing up with adoptive parents.

The Michelin star chef explained his birth mother was white and his birth father was originally from the West Indies; he said at the time of his birth, in 1969, being in an unmarried, mixed heritage relationship was frowned upon. It lead to his mother giving him up for adoption.

He said he always knew he was different; his adoptive parents were both white. He said they were ‘an amazing family’ and he had ‘never wanted for any love or felt that I was somehow missing out on something’.

“My love of food and cooking came from the big family meals we always shared together, prepared by my mother, who was a wonderful cook, and my father, who used to grow vegetables and fruit in our garden.

“I grew up appreciating the flavours of the freshest foods, picked that day and simply prepared.”

Michael, who lost his right arm in a car accident 24 years ago, was the protégé of chef Raymond Blanc.

During his career, Michael has appeared on television, on Saturday Kitchen, Master chef, Sunday Brunch, and The Great British Bake-off Extra Slice; he has cooked for the Prime Minister at 10 Downing Street, was awarded AA Chef’s Chef of the Year in 2007, has held two Michelin stars for 18 consecutive years, and awarded a Michelin star for Lympstone Manor just six months after opening.

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