'Lumber Jill' Pat honoured at last

PUBLISHED: 19:00 17 October 2008 | UPDATED: 09:49 10 June 2010

IT has taken 60 years for the government to recognise the efforts of the women who served in the Second World War - but one Exmouth woman is delighted she finally was honoured. Pat Moore, of Hamilton Court, Salterton Road, who served in the South West Wom

IT has taken 60 years for the government to recognise the efforts of the women who served in the Second World War - but one Exmouth woman is delighted she finally was honoured.Pat Moore, of Hamilton Court, Salterton Road, who served in the South West Women's Timber Corp, was finally honoured with a commemorative badge in recognition of her war efforts.Exmouth Mayor Joy Whipps and Exeter Lord Mayor Paul Smith held a ceremony for the Women's Land Army girls and the Women's Timber Corp, presenting over 50 women with certificates to go with the specially-designed badge.Mrs Moore joined the Timber Corp in 1942 at the age of 19, taking on the work of the men to free them up for the war front, and worked tirelessly in the forests felling trees, sawing timber and sharpening saws.She said: "To know we have been recognised is great - we were a great community and I have stayed friends with many of the girls."Mrs Moore was born in Bristol and when the war broke out she donned the distinctive green berets with the fir tree badge and went to work in the outdoors.As one of the 6000 women, nicknamed 'Lumber Jills', she was stationed all over the South West, first starting in Chippenham, then moving onto Cornwall as a feller of charcoal, which was used for everything, from ammunition to gas masks."We were lucky, we worked from eight to five so we had a lot of free time but later I became a lorry driver - I had to learn to drive in just two weeks."I delivered the timber to the trains, and it was just me and another who had to lift the three tonnes of logs on and off the lorry."The Timber Corp not only served the country well during the time of war, it also provided her with a career.Mrs Moore joined the Forestry Commission after the war, where she met her husband, Pat, and worked first as part of the team taking the national census of all the trees left then as a researcher.

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