Lost Treasures helps Ian raise charity cash

PUBLISHED: 15:52 15 March 2016 | UPDATED: 15:52 15 March 2016

The launch of Ian Dowell's new book Lost Treasures. Pictured from left: Ian Dowell; Hospiscare’s clinical nurse specialist Lesley Rowland; volunteer Stuart Gardner; Wendy Pilling of Best Books; Hospiscare’s Mary Fagan and Wendy Simson. Picture by Nigel Walshaw.

The launch of Ian Dowell's new book Lost Treasures. Pictured from left: Ian Dowell; Hospiscare’s clinical nurse specialist Lesley Rowland; volunteer Stuart Gardner; Wendy Pilling of Best Books; Hospiscare’s Mary Fagan and Wendy Simson. Picture by Nigel Walshaw.

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A new book on Exmouth’s glorious past has been published to raise money for charity.

Ian Dowell – a former Journal reporter and Birmingham Post and Mail editor - is the author of three previous titles, on the town’s docks, seafront, and lost shops, which have so far raised £12,000 for Exmouth and Lympstone Hospiscare.

The new volume, Lost Treasures, also in aid of the charity, features the stylish old Exmouth Railway Station and the picturesque steam line to Budleigh Salterton and the Otter Valley villages.

Illustrated with many rare archive photographs, the book also features the five brickworks which played a major part in the town’s development.

There is a four-page section on Withycombe water mill and a section on Exmouth’s private schools, including the Pencarwick, which was said to have ‘turned out more than its fair share of men who served their country well’. There are also features on many of the country mansions and historic buildings that once adorned Exmouth and surrounding areas - such as the residences on the Marley and Bystock estates, Marpool Hall in Phear Park, the Market House on the Strand and the Customs House at the docks.

There are also memories of Exmouth’s old cinemas.

Lost Treasures (£4.95) is available from Best Books in The Parade, Harbour News, Hulham Road Stores, Just Cards in Exmouth Market, Kings Garden and Leisure, Dart’s Farm, Porky Down, Sleeman’s, Brian J Toye, Hairport, and the Card Shop Too, Budleigh Salterton.


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