Longboat plans rubberstamped

THE controversial two-year battle to rebuild the Longboat Caf� as a glass-fronted restaurant is over after planning consent was reaffirmed on Tuesday.

THE controversial two-year battle to rebuild the Longboat Caf� as a glass-fronted restaurant is over after planning consent was reaffirmed on Tuesday.

East Devon’s Development Management Committee voted unanimously, 16-0, to approve the bid.

The owners can now start building work or even sell the site if they chose, complete with consent for three years - but planners could still face a legal action by campaigners.

Planning consent had been given on June 1 – but a failed attempt by campaigners to get the building listed led to the final decision being delayed.


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Campaigners insisted that the listing of the nearby coastguard cottages should have included the Longboat House, but Whitehall chiefs rejected the bid because the building had been altered too much.

Helen Tickle of the Otter Valley Association said that English Nature’s view that the plans would affect the setting of the Jurassic Coast should take precedence.

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“It is verging on the perverse to ignore the wishes of local people, English Nature and the town council,” she said.

David Daniel said they could launch a legal challenge on the basis that EDDC failed to ‘consider the impact’ on the nearby coastguard cottages and claims that reports by planners were ‘deeply flawed’.

“It is simply nonsense to claim there is no unity or linkage to the coastguard cottages.

“The Longboat is within the setting of listed buildings,” he said.

“Your own conservation officer says it has significant historical value within the local context.”

Rob Wilshire said: “It is the only surviving example of a Longboat House.

“With nothing else to compare it with it is also the best example of a Longboat House.”

Councillor Ray Franklin said: “What has changed since June 1? Nothing. Along with councillor Malcolm Florey I support his application.”

Cllr Anne Liverton said: “The only reason the final decision was deferred was to await the result of a listing application.

“The building was deemed not worthy of listing.”

Development manager Ed Freeman said: “While the level of support against the application is important, it should not be the determinative issue.

“If the building retained more of its original features it would have had amore determinative impact.

“Clearly there have been alot objections.

“But in terms of a percentage of the population they are probably relatively small.”

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