Littleham school children learn to keep safe

CHILDREN at Littleham Church of England Primary School learned how to keep safe despite concerns about speeding motorists on Littleham Road.

CHILDREN at Littleham Church of England Primary School learned how to keep safe despite concerns about speeding motorists on Littleham Road.

They took part in a range of activities around the theme of ‘Kids say Slow down!’ for Road Safety Week.

Police Community Support Officer (PCSO) Malcolm Maguire, PC Jason Colcott and children from years three and four used a SID (Speed Indication Detection).

They monitored and recorded the speeds, up to 39mph, and talked about their findings.


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Pupils were also given advice about how to cross the road safely and they made posters which will be displayed outside.

The children also plan to write letters to their local town and district councillors .

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PCSO Maguire said: “An event like this has a real impact. It is informative for the children and encourages the children to think about how quickly cars are moving. Sometimes cars can appear to be moving much slower than they are.”

PC Colcott said: “As a response officer who normally responds to emergencies it is great to see how projects like this can raise awareness to all.”

Kerry Hughes, the school’s new crossing patroller, said: “The safety of the children is of the upmost importance and children should be able to cross the road without being intimated and rushed.”

Sue Henson of Littleham Residents Association praised the awareness week and said: “We’ve wanted to get the speed down for a long time along this road. We’ve wanted a timed flashing light here for some time.”

Head teacher Duncan Nelmes added: “During the summer and at key times during the day the traffic can present a real danger to children along the Littleham Road.

“An event like this has shown us all how non-enforceable equipment can reduce the speed of traffic significantly.”

Pupil Marshall Elliot said: “We learned that to cross the road we had to look, listen and think.”

Pupil Fenton Richards said: “Someone could have been hurt because one car was going at 36 mph. Luckily we wore yellow jackets to be seen.”

Pupil Thomas Preece added: “The police told us that the cars were travelling more slowly than usual because they could see the police. They said that when they are not there that the cars often break the speed limit.”

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