Jurassic-period trees planted this week

THE Magnolia Centre had three new trees planted this week - a species that flourished millions of years before the human race walked the earth.

THE Magnolia Centre had three new trees planted this week - a species that flourished millions of years before the human race walked the earth.

To reflect the town's connection with the Jurassic Coast, Devon County Council and East Devon District Council are leading a scheme to plant three Ginkgo trees at the southern end of the Magnolia Centre.

Ginkgo biloba may be familiar as a herbal remedy; but this fascinating tree can be traced directly back to the Jurassic period with fossilised Ginkgos having been found throughout the northern hemisphere.

Councillor Eileen Wragg, Devon County Councillor for Exmouth Littleham and Town, said: "This is entirely appropriate and in line with the Latin motto of Exmouth, which translated, means 'The Sea Enriches, The Flowers Adorn'.


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"Trees have been included in this, particularly the magnolia, which was first introduced to this country in our lovely town.

"With Exmouth's designation as a Gateway Town to the Jurassic Coast, these trees will enhance the town's reputation even more."

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Councillor Darryl Nicholas, East Devon District Council's Exmouth Champion, said: "There are many parts to the jigsaw that makes up a vibrant, attractive, relaxed and inviting town centre.

"Along with the proposed enhancements to The Strand, these new trees will play a part in improving the ambience of the Magnolia Centre, where their ancient charm will provide both a colourful display and welcome shade from what we hope will be many hot sun-drenched summer days."

In the wild the Ginkgo is now only found in the northwest of Zhejiang province in the Tianmu Shan mountain reserve in eastern China, but it is widely cultivated throughout the world.

The Ginkgo also enhances many great cities; New York has many thousand Ginkgos lining its streets among the high-rise blocks of Manhattan and the open spaces of Central Park.

Graham Joyce of Dartmoor Tree Surgeons, who will be supplying and planting the trees starting from Tuesday said: "We are delighted to be involved with this project. It is always a pleasure to be associated with the long term enhancement of an area and these trees will give pleasure to the many people who use this area every day.

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