Exmouth Strand service to remember Battle of Jutland fallen heroes

PUBLISHED: 12:34 26 May 2016 | UPDATED: 15:09 26 May 2016

MC2 Pearcey and MC2 Trayler being presented the Commando Spirit award by the Chairman of The Royal British Legion, Dave Turner.Ref exe Sea Cadets Awards Night 2.

MC2 Pearcey and MC2 Trayler being presented the Commando Spirit award by the Chairman of The Royal British Legion, Dave Turner.Ref exe Sea Cadets Awards Night 2.

Archant

Heroes who lost their lives at sea 100 years ago while fighting for their country are to be remembered in Exmouth on Sunday.

To mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland, the Royal British Legion Exmouth Branch (RBL) is calling on people from the town to commemorate those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the World War One sea battle.

A service to remember the fallen will be held at 11am on Sunday, May 29, at The Strand war memorial.

At the 11th hour, veterans and youth groups will stand shoulder to shoulder with Exmouth’s forces family for a wreath-laying ceremony led by the town’s mayor, Brian Cole. Wreaths will also be laid by the Royal British Legion and service organisations.

Dave Turner, chairman of the RBL Exmouth branch, said: “There are some names on our war memorial of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice at this infamous battle.

“Family relatives will also be laying some wreaths to pay their respects to the fallen forefathers.”

The service will be conducted by the Reverend Jim Gosling. There will be readings by leading cadet Kai Brockway, Exmouth Sea Cadets, Matthew Jackson, from Exmouth Community College, and Barry George, from RBL Exmouth. Service sheets will be available on the day.

Those keen to learn more about the historic event are invited to visit an RBL road trailer. It will be in the area after the service, displaying historical information on the Battle of Jutland.

The Battle of Jutland was the principal naval battle of World War One, which took place from Wednesday, May 31, to Thursday, June 1, 1916.

After the battle, both sides claimed victory. But the damage to the German High Seas Fleet was such that Germany avoided fleet-to-fleet engagements for the remainder of the war.

Some 250 ships were involved in the battle; 151 from the Royal Navy and 99 from the German High Seas Fleet

Some 100,000 sailors served in the battle. More than 8,500 people were killed - 6,500 were British – many died because of the sudden explosion of ships.

The Queen’s father, George V1, then Prince Albert, took part in the battle aboard HMS Collingwood.

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