Exmouth’s pavement have become ‘an obstacle course’

PUBLISHED: 06:30 05 July 2017 | UPDATED: 09:15 05 July 2017

Kevin Ballard, who is unhappy about the loose pavements in the town. Ref exe 27 17TI 6399. Picture: Terry Ife

Kevin Ballard, who is unhappy about the loose pavements in the town. Ref exe 27 17TI 6399. Picture: Terry Ife

Archant

Loose paving slabs have turned Exmouth town centre into an ‘obstacle course’ for elderly residents, one resident has warned.

Loose pavements in the town. Ref exe 27 17TI 6404. Picture: Terry IfeLoose pavements in the town. Ref exe 27 17TI 6404. Picture: Terry Ife

Kevin Ballard, 67, claims that a number of elderly people tripped in the town.

He told the Journal that he had to pick an elderly woman up after she fell over loose paving stones in the Magnolia Centre, near the old post office.

“She seemed alright afterwards – she had hurt the side of her face under her glasses,” said Mr Ballard.

“I sat her on the chairs by the old post office.

“How many older people need to fall over in the town centre before the pavements in town are repaired? It’s like an obstacle course.

“Nearly every week I read that someone has fallen over in town, but nothing is done about it.

“The paving stones near Barclays, for as long as I can remember, have been broken.

“It’s not fair to the people living in the town.”

The Magnolia Centre has been highlighted as a problem spot for trip hazards by Mr Ballard.

Devon County Council (DCC), which is responsible for highways and pavements, said it was investing £1.65 million into footways.

A DCC spokesman said: “The county council is investing £1.65m into footways in this current financial year and this includes a scheme to re-lay paving in the Parade, on the northern edge of the Magnolia Centre.

“We are currently finalising a schedule of works.

“All pavements are inspected regularly. For instance, the paving along Magnolia Walk is checked every month.

“This enables us to prioritise potential improvement schemes in our annual programme.

“Defects that meet the national criteria, used by councils across the UK, are repaired as soon as possible, usually by the end of the next working day.”


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