Exmouth woman with a rare life-limited condition taking on charity cycle ride

PUBLISHED: 07:00 26 February 2019

Charlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0615. Picture: Terry Ife

Charlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0615. Picture: Terry Ife

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An Exmouth woman whose invisible illness can leave her with injuries similar to those suffered during a high impact car crash is gearing up for a 190-mile charity cycle ride.

Charlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0477. Picture: Terry IfeCharlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0477. Picture: Terry Ife

Charlotte Myatt, 25, spent the majority of her life thinking her daily pain was ‘the norm’ and had ‘every test under the sun’ before being diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome last year.

The rare condition affects the connective tissue between the skin and bones, rendering sufferers with fragile skin and making them susceptible to injury.

Former Exmouth Community College student Charlotte will attempt to ride on a recumbent tricycle from Lands End to Exmouth accompanied by her dad and uncle later this year to raise public awareness of the condition.

Charlotte is also raising funds for The Ehlers-Danlos Support UK and has already smashed her initial target of £200.

Charlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0615. Picture: Terry IfeCharlotte Myatt on her recumbant tricycle. Ref exe 08 19TI 0615. Picture: Terry Ife

She said: “My internal organs can look like I have been in a high impact car crash, where in reality I’ve just walked down the stairs.

“I was so sick because of people saying ‘why are you on crutches?’.

“It’s really difficult when it’s an invisible illness.

“I was sick of people telling me what I could and couldn’t do.

“I was so active before the diagnosis. I thought I can do it and I would rather have a few injuries than do nothing.

“Not only is it to raise awareness of the condition, it also stops me from becoming more poorly. The less active I am, the more poorly I will get.”

Charlotte said she is in ‘excruciating pain’ every day and has had to deal with joint dislocations ‘like they are going out of fashion’.

According to Charlotte, who found out she had EDS when she was 24, it takes an average of 19 years to diagnose the condition.

She feels that with an earlier diagnosis her symptoms may not have worsened and created ‘permanent and dangerous’ damage.

The teaching assistant from Brixington will set off from Lands End on Saturday, May 25, and hopes to finish in The Strand, Exmouth on the following Monday.

Click here to sponsor Charlotte.

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