Call for grass cutting as verges blight town

PUBLISHED: 16:30 09 July 2015

Overgrown verges at Gloucester Road. Ref exe 2709-27-15SH. Picture: Simon Horn

Overgrown verges at Gloucester Road. Ref exe 2709-27-15SH. Picture: Simon Horn

Archant

Grass across Exmouth is a growing cause of concern for residents, with a lack of cutting leaving verges overgrown.

This floral display at Littleham Cross is in danger of being lost in the long grass.  Ref exe 2735-27-15SH. Picture: Simon HornThis floral display at Littleham Cross is in danger of being lost in the long grass. Ref exe 2735-27-15SH. Picture: Simon Horn

The Journal’s opinion page has seen many letters on the subject during the past few weeks, following Devon County Council budget cuts, and these pictures by our photographers show that the issue is affecting the whole town, from Dinan Way to the Colony.

Exmouth Town Council’s regeneration and general purposes committee last week announced that it would consider funding some cuts ahead of Britain in Bloom judging next week.

Town councillor and Exmouth in Bloom president Pat Graham said: “The town council is in discussions with East Devon District Council about cutting some of the areas of grass which are particularly long in the centre of town.

“There have been lots of complaints. I appreciate Devon County Council needs to save money where they can, but it seems a bit of a false economy. They are cutting visibility splays, but leaving the bits in between.”

Councillor Stuart Hughes, Devon County Council cabinet member for highway management, said: “As a result of the multi-million-pound austerity cuts that have been forced on us, there is not enough funding to deliver the same level of service that there has been in the past, which means we’re having to ask communities to do more to help themselves as we adjust to cuts in funding.

“We have consulted on our approach to grass cutting, which is to do the minimum safe amount. Where grass is causing a safety issue obscuring signs, we will report this to our contractor.”


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