But why are you in favour?

What a sad letter was printed in last week s Budleigh Journal. Sad, not because the writer did not agree with previous correspondents who had carefully outlined their objections to the Longboat plans, but because he chose to try to make his point solely

What a sad letter was printed in last week's Budleigh Journal.

Sad, not because the writer did not agree with previous correspondents who had carefully outlined their objections to the Longboat plans, but because he chose to try to make his point solely by characterising them as "wafflers" and "members of the Nimbyistic elite". If only this two-storey monstrosity were indeed planned in Budleigh's backyard, rather than in its gorgeous front garden.

In contrast, he himself failed to put into words why he was in favour of the plan.

Just for clarity's sake, herewith are some of the reasons why I think that the planned construction of the Longboat restaurant will not be to the benefit of the town of Budleigh Salterton, and its surrounding community:

l A restaurant of the proposed size - and especially with its two storeys dominating the entire surroundings - would change the nature of Budleigh Salterton, not just for now but for ever.

l It would interrupt the sweeping views over Budleigh Bay,

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l It would destroy the isolated dignity of the war memorial by crowding upon its aspect.

l It would impinge upon the coastal path and on access to the Otter Valley Nature Reserve.

l It would ignore the principles behind the declaration of Budleigh Salterton as a Heritage Site and as an Area of Outstanding National Beauty.

l The position of its roof would make it an easy target for vandals and mischief makers.

l It would destroy a much-used, necessary and attractive shelter for the considerable number of passers-by, young and old, when the weather, as it always does, suddenly turns nasty.

l As a commercial undertaking, it would compromise the surrounding area and, by requiring regular vehicular access, it would endanger pedestrians on the coastal path, which is quite narrow at that point.

l As time went by, it would almost inevitably result in the commercial equivalent of 'mission creep', and, in the event of failure, the owner could well have resort to pressure for change of use.

Henriette Feltham,

Budleigh Salterton, (via email).

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