Clearing the coastline of plastic earns praise for Budleigh’s sea champions

PUBLISHED: 17:12 22 October 2018 | UPDATED: 17:12 22 October 2018

Beach clean volunteers from Budleigh Salterton earned praise from a national sea protection charity for clearing the coastline of plastic.
Volunteers recently took part in the annual Marine Conversation Society (MCS) beach clean � a national event � clearing rubbish from the Lime Kiln area of beach.

Beach clean volunteers from Budleigh Salterton earned praise from a national sea protection charity for clearing the coastline of plastic. Volunteers recently took part in the annual Marine Conversation Society (MCS) beach clean � a national event � clearing rubbish from the Lime Kiln area of beach.

Archant

Sea champions from Budleigh Salterton earned praise from a national charity for clearing the coastline of plastic.

Volunteers recently took part in the annual Marine Conversation Society (MCS) beach clean – a national event – clearing rubbish from the Lime Kiln area of beach.

More than half of the debris found was plastic, and the public found to be the main culprits for leaving litter.

The Marine Conversation Society thanked the Budleigh volunteers for taking part in September’s Great British Beach Clean, and for supplying the charity with data, enabling it to ‘push for change’.

Lizzie Prior, MCS beach and river clean project officer, said: “A massive thank you to the volunteers at Budleigh Salterton for their hard work removing the harmful litter from on our marine environment and collecting that all important data.

“Litter that is sourced from the public usually comes from people directly dropping litter on the beach or inland where litter is washed into drains, streams and rivers, which all leads to our ocean.

“However, we can all do our bit in reducing waste by avoiding single-use plastics in our day-to-day lives and ensure everything is disposed of properly.”

Pupils from St Peter’s Primary School, families and residents joined forces to scour 100 metres of the beach at low tide.

Within the space of an hour, the group collected 513 pieces of rubbish, including plastic and polysterene, metal, sanitary waste, paper and cardboard.

Almost 40 per cent of the rubbish found was left by the public; non-sourced debris, which the MCS says is too difficult to pinpoint its origin because it is ‘too tiny to identify’, made up 40 per cent of the collected litter.

A spokesperson for volunteers said: “I would like to say that the results showed a lot of rubbish; there wasn’t.

“In total, we just filled a big rubbish bag, and not heavy, as most of the things were plastics, small sizes, or in pieces.

“The survey was so successful that we are thinking about doing almost one per season.

“It would be really great if other volunteers will join this amazing initiative and take responsibility for other sections of the beach.”

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