‘Learn lessons in Joanna’s memory’- father of Ethiopia Airlines crash victims reacts to new report

PUBLISHED: 08:00 29 September 2020

Adrian Toole with his daughter Jo who died in the Ethiopia Airlines crash. Picture: Adrian Toole

Adrian Toole with his daughter Jo who died in the Ethiopia Airlines crash. Picture: Adrian Toole

Archant

The father of an Exmouth woman who died in the Ethiopia Airlines crash wants lessons to be learnt in her memory.

Joanna Toole, who was killed while flying from Ethiopia to Kenya. Picture: Adrian TooleJoanna Toole, who was killed while flying from Ethiopia to Kenya. Picture: Adrian Toole

Joanna Toole was one of 157 passengers and crew killed when flight ET302 crashed in March 2019, six minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa en route to Nairobi in Kenya.

Mr Toole was speaking in reaction to a report from the United States House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee which heavily criticised Boeing’s role in this crash and another accident involving a plane operated by Lion Air.

A total of 346 people died as a result of the two crashes which both involved Boeing 737 Max jets.

The report said there was a ‘culture of concealment’ at Boeing which it said had withheld key information from the Federal Aviation Administration.

In a statement, Boeing said it had learned ‘many hard lessons’ from the accidents and had since made ‘fundamental changes as a company’.

Joanna’s father Adrian Toole said: “It still remains tremendously difficult to come to terms with the nature of Joanna’s death and the circumstances behind it.

“As we continue to learn more about the 737 Max, we continue to be dumbfounded as to how this aircraft was allowed to fly.

“The findings of this report stir a real mixture of emotions. We feel justified in needing to press for additional answers but we are also incredibly angry that passengers and air crew were allowed to fly on this aircraft.

“Our family will never be the same without Jo, but we are determined to honour her memory by ensuring all possible lessons can be learned from her death and the deaths of more than 300 other people.

“There are still too many unanswered questions and concerns about the entire process involving the Max and its design. Until these are all fully addressed that aircraft should remain grounded.”

A spokesman for Boeing said: “As this report recognises, we have made fundamental changes to our company as a result, and continue to look for ways to improve.

“Change is always hard and requires daily commitment, but we as a company are dedicated to doing the work.”


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Exmouth Journal. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Comments have been disabled on this article.

Latest from the Exmouth Journal