A 112-year-old new recruit for Exmouth Sea Cadets!

PUBLISHED: 10:00 15 March 2017

A 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets.  PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REES

A 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets. PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REES

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Exmouth Sea Cadets has recently been joined by its latest recruit - a 112-year-old named Horatio.

A 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets.  PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REESA 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets. PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REES

The sea cadets’ base in Camperdown Terrace is the new home of a priceless statue of Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson, thanks to a kind donation from the Royal Naval Association’s Exmouth branch (RNA).

The presentation was made by RNA member Matt Marriott, who told the cadets how the statue came about and entrusted its care to them.

Admiral Lord Nelson died at the Battle of Trafalgar on the flagship HMS Victory on October, 21,1805. HMS Victory’s sister ship was HMS St Vincent, a 120-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, laid down in 1810 at Devonport Dockyard and launched on March, 11, 1815.

On Her decommision in 1905, it is believed a shipwright at the naval dockyard Haslar Creek, Portsmouth, carved the statue of Nelson from the wood of HMS St Vincent and for years it was in the hands of the White Ensign Club, before moving to the RNA.

A 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets.  PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REESA 112 year-old wood carving of Lord Nelson was donated for safe keeping to Exmouth Sea Cadets. PICTURE: DAVE SOMERTON-REES

Dave Wilson, of Wilsons Paints in Exmouth, has carefully restored and preserved this great piece of naval history.

Nelson’s former wife Lady Nelson’s connection with Exmouth began after her husband eloped with Lady Hamilton in 1799, humiliating her in high society.

She received separation payments from her husband, and bought a house on the Beacon in 1807.

She is believed to have lived comfortably in the town, and was buried in Littleham Churchyard.

Neil Gregory, the Commanding Officer of Exmouth Sea Cadets, told the Journal: “We are proud and honoured to recieve Nelson’s statue and he will take pride of place within our headquarters.”

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